April new book releases

I’ve got my eyes on you – Mary Higgins Clark – From #1 New York Times bestselling author and “Queen of Suspense” comes a thrilling investigation asking what we truly know about the those we trust, and the secrets lying in even the most idyllic of neighborhoods.

The female persuasion – Meg Wolitzer – Charming and wise, knowing and witty, Meg Wolitzer delivers a novel about power and influence, ego and loyalty, womanhood and ambition. At its heart,The Female Persuasion is about the flame we all believe is flickering inside of us, waiting to be seen and fanned by the right person at the right time. It’s a story about the people who guide and the people who follow (and how those roles evolve over time), and the desire within all of us to be pulled into the light.

Varina – Charles Frazier – Her marriage prospects limited, teenage Varina Howell agrees to wed the much-older widower Jefferson Davis, with whom she expects the secure life of a Mississippi landowner. Davis instead pursues a career in politics and is eventually appointed president of the Confederacy, placing Varina at the white-hot center of one of the darkest moments in American history—culpable regardless of her intentions.

The Confederacy falling, her marriage in tatters, and the country divided, Varina and her children escape Richmond and travel south on their own, now fugitives with “bounties on their heads, an entire nation in pursuit.”

Intimate in its detailed observations of one woman’s tragic life and epic in its scope and power, Varina is a novel of an American war and its aftermath. Ultimately, the book is a portrait of a woman who comes to realize that complicity carries consequences.

Rocket men – Robert Kurson – “Rocket Men is a timely and thrilling reminder of a heroic American achievement—three dashing astronauts and the first rendezvous with the Moon. It has it all—suspense, drama, risk, and loving families. We could use those days again.”—Tom Brokaw

Shoot first – Stuart Woods – Stone Barrington is enjoying a round of golf in Key West when the game is violently interrupted–and it seems as if the target of the disturbance may have been one of his playing companions, the brilliant businesswoman behind a software startup on the cutting edge of technology. Soon, it becomes clear that this incident is only the first thrust in a deadly scheme to push the beautiful young woman out of the way and put her company’s valuable secrets up for grabs.

From the sun-soaked Florida shores to an idyllic English country retreat, Stone embarks on a quest to protect his lovely new companion while searching for the mastermind behind the plot against her. But he may find that her enemy is far more resourceful–and dangerous–than he could have anticipated.

After Anna – Lisa Scottoline – “Entertaining…This fast-paced read culminates in a daring chase that would play well on the big screen.” —Publishers Weekly

Fascism – Madeleine Albright – Having grown up in Czechoslovakia under the Nazi and Communist regimes, former Secretary of State Albright can give context to her discussion of the rise of reactionary tendencies in the world today, from Russia’s Vladimir Putin, the Philippines’ Rodrigo Duterte, and Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Marine Le Pen, Brexit, and Donald Trump. Here she explains why these views are bursting forth, how they can be countered, and what the consequences will be if they aren’t.

The Duchess -Penny Junor – British journalist Junor has penned biographies of the Prince and the Princess of Wales and their two sons, so why not Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall? Junor argues that while Camilla helped wreck the marriage of Charles and Diana, in the end she has restored the reputation of the royal family.

The fallen – David Baldacci – Amos Decker is the Memory Man. Following a football-related head injury that altered his personality, Decker is now unable to forget even the smallest detail–as much a curse as it is a blessing. And in #1 New York Times bestselling author David Baldacci’s gripping new thriller, Decker’s life might be about to change again…

A higher loyalty – James Comey – Former FBI director James Comey shares his never-before-told experiences from some of the highest-stakes situations of his career in the past two decades of American government, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like, and how it drives sound decisions. His journey provides an unprecedented entry into the corridors of power, and a remarkable lesson in what makes an effective leader.

Then she was gone – Lisa Jewell – Ten years after her beloved 15-year-old daughter Ellie disappeared, Laurel is charmed when she meets Floyd at a café, surprised when her feelings for him grow deeper, and absolutely shocked to meet Floyd’s daughter, who looks exactly like Ellie.

The only story – Julian Barnes – A love affair between a 48-year-old and a 19-year-old is hardly unheard of, but Man Booker Prize winner Barnes reverses gender expectations, with home-from-university Paul falling for married mother Susan Mcleod when they’re partnered together at a mixed doubles tournament at their south-of-London tennis club. First, they’re lovers, then they’re living together, combating irate family members on both sides. Decades later Paul contemplates all that went so well and all that finally went wrong.

Magnolia table – Joanna Gaines – Magnolia Table is infused with Joanna Gaines’ warmth and passion for all things family, prepared and served straight from the heart of her home, with recipes inspired by dozens of Gaines family favorites and classic comfort selections from the couple’s new Waco restaurant, Magnolia Table, which opens early 2018.

You think it, I’ll say it – Curtis Sittenfeld – Throughout the ten stories in You Think It, I’ll Say It, Sittenfeld upends assumptions about class, relationships, and gender roles in a nation that feels both adrift and viscerally divided. In “The World Has Many Butterflies,” married acquaintances play a strangely intimate game with devastating consequences. In “Vox Clamantis in Deserto,” a shy Ivy League student learns the truth about a classmate’s seemingly enviable life. In “A Regular Couple,” a high-powered lawyer honeymooning with her husband is caught off guard by the appearance of the girl who tormented her in high school. And in “The Prairie Wife,” a suburban mother of two fantasizes about the downfall of an old friend whose wholesome lifestyle empire may or may not be built on a lie.

The best cook in the world – Rick Bragg – Margaret Bragg does not own a single cookbook. She measures in “dabs” and “smidgens” and “tads” and “you know, hon, just some.” She cannot be pinned down on how long to bake corn bread (“about 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the mysteries of your oven”). Her notion of farm-to-table is a flatbed truck. But she can tell you the secrets to perfect mashed potatoes, corn pudding, redeye gravy, pinto beans and hambone, stewed cabbage, short ribs, chicken and dressing, biscuits and butter rolls. Many of her recipes, recorded here for the first time, pre-date the Civil War, handed down skillet by skillet, from one generation of Braggs to the next. In The Best Cook in the World, Rick Bragg finally preserves his heritage by telling the stories that framed his mother’s cooking and education, from childhood into old age. Because good food always has a good story, and a recipe, writes Bragg, is a story like anything else.

The hellfire club – Jake Tapper – A debut political thriller by the CNN anchor and author of the best-selling The Outpost finds an unlikely Congressman navigating the dangerous waters of 1950s Washington, D.C., in the aftermath of a predecessor’s mysterious death, a situation that is complicated by backroom deals, underworld societies and a plot that could change the course of history.