August New Book Releases

Exposed / Lisa Scottoline

Simon Pensiera’s four-year-old daughter is sick with leukemia, and Simon is convinced that his former employer fired him because of mounting insurance costs. Lawyer and old family friend Mary DiNunzio agrees to represent Simon, but runs into problems when she discovers her partner represents the opposing side, threatening to tear the new partnership apart. When Simon’s former boss is found murdered, he is considered the prime suspect, and Mary finds herself in the middle of an even bigger dilemma. The novel is not only fast-paced and heart-tugging, but does not fail to highlight the perils of our healthcare system.

Gone Gull / Donna Andrews

Meg is spending the summer at her grandmother’s newly-opened craft centers, helping her grandmother run the studios. Before long, someone begins to commit vandalism, threatening the studio’s reputation. Meg begins to investigate the vandal and their possible motives; meanwhile, her grandfather focuses his efforts on locating a rare gull. Their missions unexpectedly collide when a dead body is discovered in one of the classrooms.

How to Behave in a Crowd / Camille Bordas

One of six brilliant children, Dory is something of an odd man out, less gifted, perhaps, than his siblings but with an excellent memory and a talent for noticing things, which—thinking himself phlegmatic—he reports in an often-affectless voice, even when he recounts the unexpected death of his father. But there is more here than meets the eye—or ear. Meanwhile, at school, he has a growing friendship with Denise, who is both anorexic and clinically depressed. She will be responsible for a show of violent emotion from Dory, one that surprises and emotionally engages the reader, who has become accustomed to a more distant, intellectual involvement with Dory’s life.

Morningstar / Ann Hood

Through this memoir, Hood chronicles her life through the books that shaped her. Although neither her family nor her school owned a collection of books, she discovered a passion for reading in second grade and, encouraged by her teacher, flew through the third and fourth grade books by the end of the school year. Although her family believed books were a waste of money, Hood found her escape through the books, and they began to shape her life and identity.

See What I Have Done / Sarah Schmidt

Schmidt’s unforgettable debut brings a legendary American crime to eerie new life. Four narrators recount events surrounding the 1892 murders of Andrew and Abby Borden. Though the witnesses’s interpretations of events differ, all describe roiling tensions. On August 4, family conflicts erupt in a chain of events that is as intricate as it is violent. Equally compelling as a whodunit, “whydunit,” and historical novel, the book honors known facts yet fearlessly claims its own striking vision. Even before the murders, the Bordens’ cruel, claustrophobic lives are not easy to visit, but from them Schmidt has crafted a profoundly vivid and convincing fictional world.

A Stranger in the House / Shari Lapena

A woman is found injured in a shady part of town. Neither the police nor her husband believes her explanation, and she herself isn’t sure what happened.

Sulfur Springs / William Kent Krueger

One night, Cork and Rainy receive a desperate voicemail from Cork’s son Peter, in which he confesses to the murder of a man called Rodriguez. The following morning, Cork and Rainy fly to  southern Arizona, where Peter has been working as a counselor in a well-known drug rehab center. When they arrive, they learn that Peter was fired six months earlier and hasn’t been heard from since. They head to the little desert town of Sulfur Springs where Peter has been receiving his mail in hope of answers, but no one in Sulfur Springs seems to know him. They do, however, recognize the name Rodriguez. Carlos Rodriguez is the head of a cartel that controls everything illegal crossing the border from Mexico into Coronado County.

 

The Truth Doesn’t Have a Side / Bennet Amalu, Mark Tabb, and Will Smith

Truth Doesn’t Have a Side follows the journey of neuropathologist Dr. Bennet Omalu, who uncovered the truth about brain damage in American football players, and his battle against those who would silence him. An incredible story that could change the course of sports culture.