Teen Poetry Month Website Pi

National Poetry Month – Teen Books

April is National Poetry Month, and we have selected the best Teen books that include poetry. Check them out!

And we stay / Jenny Hubbard – Sent to an Amherst, Massachusetts, boarding school after her ex-boyfriend shoots himself, seventeen-year-old Emily expresses herself through poetry as she relives their relationship, copes with her guilt, and begins to heal.

Blue lipstick : concrete poems / by John Grandits – A 15-year-old girl named Jessie voices typical—and not so typical—teenage concerns in this unique, hilarious collection of poems. Her musings about trying out new makeup and hairstyles, playing volleyball and cello, and dealing with her annoying younger brother are never boring or predictable. Who else do you know who designs her own clothes and writes poetry to her cat? Jessie’s a girl with strong opinions, and she isn’t shy about sharing them. Her funny, sarcastic take on high school life is revealed through concrete poetry: words, ideas, type, and design that combine to make pictures and patterns. The poems are inventive, irreverent, irresistible, and full of surprises—just like Jessie—and the playful layout and ingenious graphics extend the wry humor.

The firefly letters : a suffragette’s journey to Cuba / Margarita Engle – Poems describe early women’s right pioneer Frederika Bremer’s life-changing journey to Cuba in 1851, as her path crosses that of Cecilia, a translator and slave, and of Elena, a rich girl who feels limited by her place in society.

I felt a funeral, in my brain / Will Walton – For most of his young life Avery has dealt with his alcoholic mother with the help of his grandfather Pal–he immerses himself in poetry and popular music, and now that high school is over for the summer, he makes out with his best friend Luca (who understands about alcoholic mothers), but the death of his grandfather creates a hole in his life that he can not seem to crawl out of.

Paint me like I am : teen poems / from WritersCorps – Paint Me Like I Am is a collection of poems by teens who have taken part in writing programs run by a national nonprofit organization called WritersCorps. To read the words of these young people is to hear the diverse voices of teenagers everywhere.

The poet X / a novel by Elizabeth Acevedo – When Xiomara Batista, who pours all her frustrations and passion into poetry, is invited to join the school slam poetry club, she struggles with her mother’s expectations and her need to be heard.

The Sweet revenge of Celia Door / Karen Finneyfrock – Fourteen-year-old Celia, hurt by her parents’ separation, the loss of her only friend, and a classmate’s cruelty, has only her poetry for solace until newcomer Drake Berlin befriends her, comes out to her, and seeks her help in connecting with the boy he left behind.

The stars at Oktober Bend / Glenda Millard – Alice is fifteen, with hair as red as fire and skin as pale as bone. Something inside Alice is broken: she remembers words but struggles to speak them. Still, Alice knows words are for sharing, so she pins them to posters in tucked-away places: railway waiting rooms, fish-and-chip shops, quiet corners. Manny is sixteen, with a scar from shoulder to elbow. Something inside Manny is broken: he was once a child soldier, forced to do terrible, violent things. But in a new land with new people who will care for him, he spends time exploring on foot. And in his pocket, he carries a poem he scooped up. And he knows the words by heart. When Manny and Alice meet, their relationship brings the beginning of love and healing.

That thing we call a heart / Sheba Karim – High school has ended and Shabnam Qureshi is facing a summer of loneliness and boredom. She’s felt alienated from her gutsy best friend, Farah, ever since Farah started wearing the Muslim head scarf — without bothering to discuss it with Shabnam first. No one else comes close to understanding her, especially not her parents. All Shabman wants to do is get through the summer. Get to Penn, Begin anew. Not look back. Until she meets Jamie, who scores her a job at his aunt’s pie shack and meets her there every afternoon. Shabnam sees Jamie and herself like the rose and the nightingale of classic Urdu poetry, which, according to her father, is the ultimate language of desire. Jamie finds Shabnam fascinating — her curls, her culture, even her awkwardness. Shabnam quickly finds herself in love. In her quest to figure out who she really is and what she really wants, Shabnam looks for help in an unexpected place—her family.

White Rose / by Kip Wilson – Tells the story of Sophie Scholl, a young German college student who challenges the Nazi regime during World War II as part of the White Rose, a non-violent resistance group.